Category: Uncategorized (Page 1 of 2)

Toward a More Perfect Union: Overcoming Race and Class Divides

Join us Friday March 12 at 4 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar featuring Prof. Glenn Loury of Brown and Ms. Jodi Shaw, formerly of Smith College, discussing how to overcome race and class divides in America. (Link to be posted soon.)

When Anti-Racism and Anti-Classism come into conflict, how can workers and employers and our culture as a whole best navigate a way of fairness? How can the search for fairness racially and economically unite rather than divide Americans?

Jodi Shaw publicly resisted Anti-Racism training for predominantly white lower-socioeconomic staff like herself at Smith as biased against low-status whites. A divorced low-income mother of two, she said she was forced from her job at the elite college.

Prof. Glenn Loury speaks from years of work on issues related to class and race, as a prominent economist and African-American public intellectual, concerned with bias while questioning the fairness of some Anti-Racism practices today.

Webinar with Prof. Shelby Steele, Prof. John W. Fountain, Eli Steele, and Ken Langone

Nov. 17, 2020
Systemic Racism: Truth or Poetic Truth? Two Perspectives

Professors Steele and Fountain offer different perspectives on systemic racism, with filmmaker Eli Steele, and Bucknell alumnus Ken Langone, focused on the new film What Killed Michael Brown?

Webinar video here: https://mediaspace.bucknell.edu/media/2020-11-18-Systemic-Racism/1_9rioy69k

Links for info related to the discussion:

What Killed Michael Brown? film by Eli Steele with Prof. Steele
Soul Cries book by Prof. Fountain
Southland College Prep High School
Providence St. Mel School

Sponsored by the Open Discourse Coalition

Systemic Racism: Truth or Poetic Truth? Two Perspectives

8-9 p.m. Tuesday Nov. 17, Film Preview available earlier, 5 to 8 p.m.

Prof. Shelby Steele, Stanford’s Hoover Institution
Prof. John W. Fountain, Roosevelt U., Chicago Sun-Times
Filmmaker Eli Steele

A dialogue on the Steeles’ new film What Killed Michael Brown?

Introduced by Bucknell alumnus Kenneth G. Langone ’57, announcing a new initiative to support thoughtful and informed dialogue at Bucknell.

Link to the Zoom webinar discussion: https://bucknell.zoom.us/j/95293535841?pwd=RERhUWZLWGFoRkg2UkVFN0xFQzZuZz09

What Killed Michael Brown? will be available for free viewing prior to the webinar discussion from 5 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 17, on Vimeo (it is also available for rental or purchase on Amazon Prime). It is about two hours long. During the above time period, the film can be accessed in preparation for the webinar at https://vimeo.com/466293394, with the password available here (Bucknell password needed to access): http://filmshowing.blogs.bucknell.edu/

Shelby Steele is a former self-described militant Black radical from Chicago who is now a fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, an English Professor whose work has focused on issues of race and racism. His son producer Eli Steele made the new film featuring his father’s reflections on those issues in America today.

John W. Fountain is Professor of Journalism at Roosevelt University, award-winning columnist at the Chicago Sun-Times, author, and former New York Times National Correspondent. His writings have focused on issues of race, inner-city communities and families, and on his own experience growing up Black in a low-income Chicago neighborhood.

Eli Steele is an award-winning documentary and film maker, and head of Man of Steele Productions, whose credits include How Jack Became Black, a documentary on issues of multiracial and ethnic identity in America, and the feature film What’s Bugging Seth, which explores deafness as a disability.

Kenneth G. Langone ’57 is a co-founder of Home Depot and founder of the Invemed venture capital firm. From a working-class immigrant family, he has gone on to fund many scholarships in higher education.

Hear the different perspectives of Professors Steele and Fountain and Eli Steele, in their discussion of the film, on whether systemic racism today is an oppressive truth that needs to be addressed to create a just America, or a strategy of “poetic truth” exacerbating social division in America.

This program is part of the Bucknell Program for American Leadership and Citizenship’s Tucker-Brawley-Ramer Initiative for informed and thoughtful dialogue in the liberal arts tradition. The Initiative is named chronologically for three prominent Bucknell alumni who embodied that goal in their careers: Andrew Gregg Tucker ‘1862, fatally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg defending American ideals while fighting for the Union; Rev. Edward McKnight Brawley ‘1875 MA ‘1878, whose work in founding institutions of higher education exemplified positive engagement of religious faith with the liberal arts; and George H. Ramer ’50, who bravely died resisting totalitarianism.

Co-sponsored by the Open Discourse Coalition.

Robert George-Cornel West Webinar 2020

Video of 10/26/20 Program:

https://mediaspace.bucknell.edu/media/2020-10-26-Civil-Disagreement/1_i85tbvxm

This program was part of the Bucknell Program for American Leadership and Citizenship’s Tucker-Brawley-Ramer Initiative for informed and thoughtful dialogue in the liberal arts tradition. The Initiative is named chronologically for three prominent Bucknell alumni who embodied that goal in their careers: Andrew Gregg Tucker ‘1862, fatally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg defending American ideals while fighting for the Union; Rev. Edward McKnight Brawley ‘1875 MA ‘1878, whose work in founding institutions of higher education exemplified positive engagement of religious faith with the liberal arts; and George H. Ramer ’50, who bravely died resisting totalitarianism.

Co-sponsored by the Commonwealth Foundation and the Open Discourses Foundation.

Robert George and Cornel West Return to Bucknell: “Thoughtful Dialogue in Turbulent Times: Preserving Community Through the Liberal Arts”

Monday Oct. 26 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Zoom Webinar (link below)

https://bucknell.zoom.us/j/96994509152?pwd=ckI3anhZVkJjYmpDV1BZTG44cXZ3Zz09

The webinar will include significant time for questions to the speakers by participants.

In a time of social division, civil unrest, and economic and personal anxiety heightened by the Covid crisis, Robert P. George of Princeton and Cornel West of Harvard return to Bucknell, applying to this turbulent election session lessons from the liberal arts and intellectual and personal friendship on holding together community in America today. West is often regarded as America’s leading socialist intellectual and George as America’s leading social conservative intellectual. Both draw on their Christian faith and love of the liberal arts tradition to find ways to create community across difference. They first came to Bucknell “live” in January 2018 in a program that won great acclaim and was televised on PBS stations, as part of Bucknell’s Martin Luther King week.

Their virtual return is part of the Bucknell Program for American Leadership and Citizenship’s Tucker-Brawley-Ramer Initiative for informed and thoughtful dialogue in the liberal arts tradition. The Initiative is named chronologically for three prominent Bucknell alumni who embodied that goal in their careers: Andrew Gregg Tucker ‘1862, fatally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg defending American ideals while fighting for the Union; Rev. Edward McKnight Brawley ‘1875 MA ‘1878, whose work in founding institutions of higher education exemplified positive engagement of religious faith with the liberal arts; and George H. Ramer ’50, who bravely died resisting totalitarianism.

Co-sponsored by the Commonwealth Foundation 

Official theme song

Victor Davis Hanson 10/29

“The 70th Anniversary of the Korean War: What Its Legacy Tells Us About American Identity in the World Today”

Thursday October 29, 8 PM EDT, a Bucknell University-based online talk

Military Historian and Political Commentator Victor Davis Hanson of Stanford’s Hoover Institution will speak on the 70th Anniversary of the Korean War, America’s fight against Communist totalitarianism then and its meaning today, at an online event based at Bucknell University and open to all, Thurs. 10/29 at 8 pm.

His talk, which will include a question-and-answer session, is dedicated to the memory of Bucknell alumnus George Ramer ’50 (pictured below), a political-science and history major and local high school civics teacher, who was killed in combat in Korea by Communist forces and won the Medal of Honor for his valor.

The citation for the Medal noted: “Unable to hold the position against an immediate, overwhelming hostile counterattack, he ordered his group to withdraw and single-handedly fought the enemy to furnish cover for his men and for the evacuation of three fatally wounded Marines. Severely wounded a second time, Second Lieutenant Ramer refused aid when his men returned to help him and, after ordering them to seek shelter, courageously manned his post until the hostile troops overran his position and he fell mortally wounded.”

Ramer’s memory is honored in a bust at the entrance to the Langone Athletic Center on Bucknell University’s campus, and he is buried in Lewisburg Cemetery. A former civics teacher at Lewisburg High School, he was from a local family.

Hanson’s talk is part of the Bucknell Program for American Leadership and Citizenship’s Tucker-Brawley-Ramer Initiative for informed and thoughtful dialogue in the liberal arts tradition. The Initiative is named chronologically for three prominent Bucknell alumni who embodied that goal in their careers: Andrew G. Tucker ‘1862, fatally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg defending American ideals while fighting for the Union; Rev. Edward McKnight Brawley ‘1875 MA ‘1878, whose work in founding institutions of higher education exemplified positive engagement of religious faith with the liberal arts; and George H. Ramer ’50, who bravely died resisting totalitarianism.

Admission to this Zoom Webinar event is free, and the link to join it is here.

Co-sponsored by the Commonwealth Foundation

A Letter on Justice and Open Debate

From The New York Times report on the “Letter”, 7/7/20:

Titled “A Letter on Justice and Open Debate,” and signed by 153 prominent artists and intellectuals, it began with an acknowledgment of “powerful protests for racial and social justice” before pivoting to a warning against an “intolerant climate” engulfing the culture. “The free exchange of information and ideas, the lifeblood of a liberal society, is daily becoming more constricted,” the letter declared, citing “an intolerance of opposing views, a vogue for public shaming and ostracism and the tendency to dissolve complex policy issues in a blinding moral certainty.” “We refuse any false choice between justice and freedom, which cannot exist without each other,” it continues. “As writers we need a culture that leaves us room for experimentation, risk taking, and even mistakes.”

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